Your health is our top priority here at AFC Urgent Care Stamford. Whether you’re suffering from symptoms of the common cold or a severe illness like Pertussis (whooping cough) you can trust that the comprehensive, personalized care you need is available 7 days a week at our state-of-the-art urgent care center. Our team of board-certified physicians and medical professionals is experienced in providing accurate diagnosis and treatment for patients infected with whooping cough. We also offer preventative healthcare services – like whooping cough vaccines – to ensure you and your family are safe and healthy.

Our goal is to provide affordable healthcare for patients of all ages in the greater Stamford, CT area. That’s why we accept most major health insurance plans and offer deeply discounted self-pay rates for uninsured patients. Call AFC Urgent Care Urgent Care Stamford today or visit our conveniently located urgent care center at 3000 Summer Street in Stamford, CT to learn more about our urgent care services for whooping cough.

What is whooping cough?

A whooping cough is an infection caused by a bacterium, Bordetella pertussis. Outbreaks of a whooping cough were first described in the 16th Century.
Pertussis kills about 250,000 children worldwide each year. 18 deaths were recorded in Australia between 1993 and 2004, of whom all but 2 were children under 12 months old.
In Australia, there are epidemics of whooping cough about every 3 to 5 years, with the most recent peaks in South Australia in 2009 and 2010.

How does it spread?

The infection spreads by droplets that are coughed or sneezed out during the first 3 weeks of the illness. These droplets can be breathed in or they can be carried to the nose by hands which come in contact with the droplets (eg through handling used tissues or by touching surfaces which have the droWplets on them).
A whooping cough is very easy to catch. 70% to 100% of people living in the same house as someone with whooping cough will get the infection unless they have been immunised in the last 11 years, or have had the infection.

Who is most at risk?

Any one who is not protected (by recent immunisation or by having had the infection before) can get whooping cough, including older children and adults. Most people who get the infection in Australia are adults or young people over about 11 years of age – even if they have been immunised as a baby.
Babies are at most risk of having severe health problems from whooping cough. About 1 in 200 babies who get whooping cough before they are 6 months old will die from the infection.

Why should children and adults get vaccinated against a whooping cough?

  • Getting vaccinated is the first and strongest defense against contracting and spreading the illness
  • Adults are the most common source of pertussis infection in infants, who are at the greatest risk of health complications and death.
  • Whooping cough can cause serious health complications in adults from shortness of breath to cracked ribs
  • Women can pass the illness to infants during pregnancy. Women should get the vaccine (Tdap) late in the second trimester or in the third trimester of each pregnancy.